About time!

Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Iain Duncan Smith is to reveal this week the Government’s plans to force long-term unemployed to do manual labour or face losing their benefits. However, this decision has caused a bit of stir even before it has been properly announced. The Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams has criticised the policies arguing that it will cause jobless people “into a downward spiral of uncertainty, even despair”. Sorry I forgot the Church dictated what Government policy is, I mean come on, will making people work really bring them despair? In my opinion, it’s about time!

Our Welfare system is in a dire state and something has definitely got to be done, for too long we have allowed people to live a life on benefits and this has to stop. Society helps them so it’s about time that they made a contribution to society. The plan would see jobless people working a 30 hour week (5 hours less than the average working week), failure to turn up will result in benefits being cut for at least three weeks.

This is certainly a fair way to tackle the problem of long-term unemployment, it will help jobless people get into the routine of regular work, reinforce their CV while make a contribution to the community which has been there for them in their hour of need. Another benefit of this policy is that it will help weed out those who are conducting undeclared side-jobs. William Hague rightly said that the Welfare Benefit was one of the “big political challenges”, the UK currently is experiencing a situation where 1.9 million children live in a jobless home. What kind of example are we setting for our children? It’s about time that we sent a message to future generations that even when there isn’t work, we will still contribute to society, a society which is keeping us out of poverty.

Tim Hasker

BUCF Vice-President External

W.Midlands CF Deputy Regional Chairman

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9 thoughts on “About time!

  1. For starters, Rowan Williams should shut his trap. Taking advice from a man who has an invisible friend has never been a wise thing to do. I think the whole idea is absolutely fabulous and it’s about bloody time the government did something like this! Bravo!

    • Easy tiger. The problem with the C of E is that it’s an organisation of Telegraph readers run by Grauniad readers. I can guarantee that you won’t be hearing any such nonsense from the excellent Vincent Nichols who is the most senior Catholic in the UK.

      Getting long-term unemployed people to do voluntary work benefits society and the individual.

  2. An idea that is flawed and is destined to fail. There are many people out there on JSA who desperately want a job but can’t get one for one reason or another, and the job centre just aren’t good enough to help them get that job. All this idea does is to reduce the amount of time people can spend looking for a job and going to interviews (if they’re lucky enough to get one) and doesn’t actually solve the major problem we have, in that the job centre are ill-equipped to deal with people and incapable of helping them get back into work.

    But the Coalition Government are more interested in getting positive headlines in The Sun than actually going out and helping people.

    • Yes, I agree. Job centres don’t work. Can we get on with closing them and allow effective private sector and voluntary groups to flourish?

      • What effective private sector? There isn’t one. I never said close them anyway, I said they need to give people proper help.

  3. I’m quite sympathetic to this idea in principle, but I have some questions. How many private sector jobs will be lost as a result of this new source of cheap labour? How much will this cost to administrate and how will the unemployed be expected to get to work?

  4. Mark – only 10% of people get their jobs through the Job Centre. I couldn’t begin to describe the number of organisations which are more effective. Reposted due to moderation delay on comment with weblink.

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